How to Find and Engage Strategic Partners for Your Film

Strategic partners are key to crowdfunding and marketing your film.  Connecting with them is a key to audience building for crowdfunding and selling your downloads.

by Carole Dean

Strategic Partners

You May Not Need to Stand On Your Head to Land Strategic Partners, But You Need to Make a Concerted Effort

Strategic partners are groups or nonprofit organizations online whose members would be interested in the subject matter of your film.

Because I run From the Heart Productions, a 501(c)3 nonprofit, I’m quite aware of how careful and protective nonprofits are of their mailing lists. We never give it out.  It’s hard work getting donors who’ve gained your trust. 

Most nonprofits live off of their mailing list.  They are very familiar with their top donors and take good care of them. That includes only sending them pertinent emails regarding their mission.

But, if you follow these steps, you can build a group of strategic partners of your own. 

Start Small, Finish Big

I suggest that you make a list of the top 20 potentials for strategic partners.  Some of these will be the largest organizations online that are interested in the subject matter of your film.  

However, I wouldn’t start with any of the largest in this group. I would start with some of the smaller nonprofits.  Find out what works and what doesn’t with them.

Calling Strategic Partners – What Not to Say When You First Call

When you call these nonprofits or organizations, who can become major “connectors” to your audience, don’t say “Hi, I making a film that your members would really love.”  You will not be quickly received. Expect them to immediately close ranks unless you do this right.

They want to know a lot about you and the film you’re making.  Also, they will want to know how it will be received by their members.  You want to create a long-term relationship with the organization.  What you say and how you introduce yourself is most important.

Build Trust

It might take you more than a year to gain the trust of strategic partners.  I suggest the first call is to introduce yourself.  Tell them who you are and what you’re doing. Make it short, sweet, and engaging.

The goal is to be able to communicate with them on an on-going basis, like every 4 or 5 months, to keep them informed of your film’s development.  You know that this nonprofit’s audience is interested in the content of your film.  What you want to do is to create a relationship.  Begin building trust so they will share your film with their audience. 

Create a Script

Before your first call to potential strategic partners, get prepared and write down what you want to say and how you want the call to go.  Do not read it.  This is to remind you of the highlights you want to say.  

Establish credibility.   You want to introduce yourself as an award-winning filmmaker or someone who graduated from film school or someone who is very passionate about the subject matter.  Make clear you are determined to create this important documentary or short film.

Next, you want to give them an under a two-minute pitch of your film making sure that they get the “essence” of your film. Consider using sticky story content so that you leave them with key elements they can remember.

Don’t Ask for Help…Yet

Get the person’s name and title and ask her if you can continue to communicate with her on the progress of the film.  Don’t ask for anything else.   Hopefully, you’ve introduced yourself and your film in a charming way to create a long-term relationship.  That’s what you’re after.

This is why I want you to only contact them once you have committed to your film.  This is a key to increasing your audience for you personally as a filmmaker and for the film.

Stay in Contact

Every 3 to 5 months find something wonderful to tell them.  Call after 2 expressos and be upbeat.  Convey that you are excited about your film.  Make a good impression of you as a filmmaker and how important your film can be to their audience. 

Keep it under 3 minutes.  Your budding strategic partners will appreciate your concern for their time.  If it is hard to get them on the phone, then send a brilliant email.  Don’t expect to get a reply because you probably won’t get one. 

But, they will read it.  I know because people who apply for my grant email me all year with updates.   I read them and enjoy them but I don’t always respond because of time.  However, when they do call me or apply again to the grant, I remember them and the film.  That’s what you want.

When to Get Them Involved

After about a year, you will begin to hear the interest they have for you and the film in their voice.  This is when you can begin to decide when you can ask them to get their audience involved in your film. 

Don’t ask too soon.  You should be able to know when to ask them to post something about your film on their website or drive their audience to your website to see your trailer and you get their email address.

This is a Worthwhile Endeavor

I spoke to filmmakers who created such a great rapport that the nonprofit actually introduced him to their top donor who helped fund his film.  Anything is possible.  Create a vision of what you want from them and move towards that.

 

Carole Dean is president and founder of From the Heart Productions; a 501(c)3 non-The Art of Film Funding Podcastprofit that offers fiscal sponsorship for independent filmmakers. She hosts the weekly podcastThe Art of Film Fundinginterviewing those involved in all aspects of indie film productionShe is also the author of  The Art of Film Funding, 2nd Edition: Alternative Financing Concepts.  See IMDB for producing credits

An Invitation is at the Heart of Crowdfunding

Don’t think of crowdfunding as asking for money.  Think of it as inviting people to join your community.  You’ll be a lot more successful 

by Carole Dean

Inviting

“Invite People to Join Your Community” When Crowdfunding

When you are crowdfunding, you may think you are just asking friends, relatives, your dentist, for donations.  But, you are inviting others to join together to support you in the making of a film.  

Asking people to “join your community to make a film” is a totally different energy than asking people for donations.

This is the energy of inviting.

When Creating Your Crowdfunding Page Write it Like an Invitation.

People love films.  And hopefully, they will love yours enough to join accept your invitation. 

Every film has something remarkable about it. What is remarkable about your film?  What is it about it that will make people join together and make it happen?

Use the concept of a “sticky story” (make this a link to the article) so that people can remember what you tell them.  Create a story with something emotional, something shocking, something concrete and something very credible so they can remember and pitch your film to their friends and earn social currency.

Make a List of What You Need People To Bring

You need more than money to make a film.  The benefit of bringing a community together is gathering together those with different talents and skills.   Talents and skills you need to make your film.

You should list exactly what you need.  That might be people to help you with social networking, a personal assistant, a driver, or someone to help with food on the production, etc.  Think of the things that you want and ask for them on your page.

How to Answer “What’s In It For Me?”

You can’t invite someone to join in making your film without expecting to give them something in return.  Donors always want to know “what’s in it for me? “   

This is where you can get off the charts creative with your gifts for supporting your film.  You could have standard gifts like t-shirts, mugs and social media shout outs, but I really, find these are boring gifts.  

Think of something unusual and exciting.

Gifts That Donors Share With Others

Here’s one great example.  One person on a crowdfunding campaign was very talented with the Photoshop.   He asked people who donated “where do you want to be?” Then,  he took a photo of them and photo shopped them to that dream location. 

One person was put on the moon and another in the South Seas.  Another was place on an expensive yacht.  Of course, the donors loved these photos and they quickly posted them on Facebook, twitter, all over social media.  They also and drove new people to the filmmaker’s campaign and this created new donors.  This is what you want. You want your donors promoting you.

Recently, I had a filmmaker offer a hand-drawn portrait for $100 on her network for good campaign.  I couldn’t resist!  So I donated and she sent me a precious hand-drawn photo.   It was well worth the hundred dollars and the fun of seeing a personal rendering of a photo.

Use Your Creativity

Use that brilliant creativity of yours for your crowdfunding.  Don’t just focus on how you can get money out of someone.  Think about how you can get them to accept your invitation to help you and others make your film a reality.  

 

Carole Dean is president and founder of From the Heart Productions; a 501(c)3 non-The Art of Film Funding Podcastprofit that offers fiscal sponsorship for independent filmmakers. She hosts the weekly podcastThe Art of Film Fundinginterviewing those involved in all aspects of indie film productionShe is also the author of  The Art of Film Funding, 2nd Edition: Alternative Financing Concepts.  See IMDB for producing credits.

6 Key Tips to Help Win a Film Grant

Need to win a film grant?   Carole Dean shares her wisdom and experience on why it helps to know your audience, nail down your story, and never give up! 

By Carole Dean

Win a Film Grant

Roy W. Dean Grant winner Leslie Neale and From the Heart Productions founder and President Carole Dean

Having overseen the Roy W. Dean Grant for 26 years, I’ve read thousands of grant submissions.  Through my non-profit, From the Heart Productions, I’ve helped our fiscally sponsored filmmakers apply for and win hundreds of thousands of dollars in local, state, and foundation grants over the last 25 years.    

I know what makes our judges and others seriously consider a grant application.   Here are some tips on how you can improve your chances to win a film grant for your project.

Film Must Fit Criteria for the Grant

Grantors say this is the number one reason for denying a film a grant.  So be sure you have a chance to be accepted before you put in your time.

One woman filmmaker I worked with applied for 5 grants and won 4!  This was Rebecca Dreyfus and her film “Stolen” won the Roy W. Dean Grant.  How did she win so many?  She did not apply for hard to win grants that might have been a reach for her project.  She chose carefully and put her energy into grants she felt were the best fit for her film. 

Story, Story, Story

At the Roy W. Dean Grant, we fund stories.  Other grantors look for great stories as well.  Brilliant, heart-felt, revelatory, life altering stories with strong characters.  So when creating your application for the grant, you will need a visually written proposal.  It needs to let me “see” the film as I read your proposal. 

For Documentaries, Tell Us What The Film Will Be About

I realize you don’t know what will happen when you turn on your camera to make a documentary.  In fact, many times you are taken into an entirely different film.  However, you have to tell us what you think the film will be. 

We know you often don’t know and that’s ok.  The filmmakers behind the award winning “Virunga” thought they were just doing a documentary on an park rangers at an animal preserve when a civil war broke out.  But, we want to know that you have thought it out carefully and you “think” you know where it is going. 

I can say that most of the documentary films we funded, where the filmmaker did not know what the film would be about in the end, turned out better than any of us imagined. 

Why Are You Making This Film?

I want to know this up front.  This information tells me if you are there for the long, hard times that may lay ahead.  I want to know:  Do you have the tenacity to finish?  You have to allay my fears in the beginning of your proposal with your passion.

Who Is Your Audience?

Do you have any idea who the people are who will want to see your film?  Do you know how you will reach them?  I want you to tell me that.  All of the grantors want to know this.  Just making the film is not enough; you have to identify who will support it.  Attach your audience to the film as you are making it.  Tell us how you are doing this.

Never Give Up!!!!

It was the motto of the Suffragettes and I want you to adopt it.    Know that rejection is part of the process and that you will learn each time you are rejected.  Know that each grant you enter, you get better and so does your film.  And, you now know the people at that granting organization and in our industry.  Who you know is an asset to you.

 

Carole Dean is president and founder of From the Heart Productions; a 501(c)3 non-The Art of Film Funding Podcastprofit that offers fiscal sponsorship for independent filmmakers. She hosts the weekly podcastThe Art of Film Fundinginterviewing those involved in all aspects of indie film productionShe is also the author of  The Art of Film Funding, 2nd Edition: Alternative Financing Concepts.  See IMDB for producing credits.

6 Tips on Crowdfunding Your Film

 

From the Heart Productions has helped indie filmmakers crowdfund over $3 million for their films.  Here are some key tips on crowdfunding your film to help you successfully raise money. 

6 Tips for Crowdfunding Your Film

Don’t let crowds scare you. Get them to help you raise money for your film.

1. Emotions Fuel Donations

Among the most important of the tips on crowdfunding your film is one won’t find on the internet.  But, I can promise you that it is most effective when raising money to use emotions.

Let’s go back to some of the earliest Indiegogo campaigns that were quite successful.

First, there was the campaign for a bus monitor named Karen, who asked for $3,000 to go on a vacation. She was responsible for the children on the bus going to school. 

Someone took a camera inside the bus and recorded the vicious, demeaning, bullying statements made to her by students. She was in tears. When we saw this, we felt embarrassed and ashamed that she was being so poorly treated. 

We were touched and moved and glad to donate as a way to apologize to her.  Soon she had over $100,000 and then $200,000.  She ended up with over $700,000.  Nice vacation. 

My second favorite campaign for eliciting emotion is one that did not have a trailer. That’s right, just copy on a page. However, it was professionally done with various font types and a great choice of words.

The campaigner was an admitted geek and he said that we had forgotten Tesla, the greatest geek that ever lived. He wanted to buy back the Wardenclyffe tower, Tesla’s old laboratory, and make it a museum for Tesla.  He also used emotion in his campaign.

“Let’s build a Goddamn museum for Tesla.”, he wrote “We overlooked him and we owe it to him!”

He raised close to $1,300,000  That’s using only written words and the right attitude.  He was demanding that we make up for our lack of attention and respect to Tesla.  It made people feel sad and remiss that we’ve overlooked such a great man. 

“Touch my heart and I’ll open my pocket book.” is one of my favorite expressions for fundraising. I think that people communicate through the heart chakra.  

What’s unique about your film? How can you elicit an emotion with your words and your trailer? That emotion could be joy, happiness or guilt, shame, or any strong emotion that you believe will create an action from your audience. Hopefully, that action is a donation.

2. Setting the Right Campaign Goal 

Finding the right dollar amount to ask for is a key to a good campaign. After running many campaigns, I can say that this is the most important part of the campaign.  You need to get the goal amount right so that you can have 30% to the goal within three days of the start of the campaign.  This is a must for a successful campaign.

It’s very important to create a special group of funders that can help you reach that 30%.  Give them a name, like your “founding Indiegogo or Kickstarter sponsors.”  You will build your crowdfunding page and send the link to only this founding sponsor group first in what we call a soft launch.  You have already spoken to these people and you know exactly how much money you will raise. 

Now, you launch your campaign to your entire mailing list.  Post and chat on social media about the benefits of your film, why people should donate, and thanking those that do.

Sometimes you set your goal based on the amount you know you can raise in three days.  Example, you talk to your family, friends, and staunch supporters and realize that you can get $6,000 in the first three days. Then, set your goal at $20,000 because 30% of $20,000 is $6,000.

Now, you know you have a very good chance of hitting that goal.  That is,  assuming that you have done the work needed to create a large database of people interested in the subject matter of your film.

3. Finding Your Audience for Crowdfunding

What is unique about your film? Find that and be able to talk about how special your film is because of this uniqueness.

Start listing the various audiences that your film addresses.  For documentaries, it’s much simpler than features, but let’s just take an example of a documentary on organic food. Go online and start looking for organizations and groups who fit your film like vegetarians, vegans, organic consumers, benefits of organic food, etc.

Find those organizations through Facebook and Google. Make a list.  You want to find the top 40 organizations and set a goal to connect to at least 20.  Hopefully, they will have a minimum database of 5,000 members each. Your goal is to get them to support your film. Get them to post about your film on their database, or newsletter, or ask them to tweet about your film.

You can drive them to your website where you can collect their email address is by giving them a nice gift, something they can’t live without. Create short three minute trailers.  Then, put them on your YouTube channel to drive people to your website.  Once there, they can’t resist your gift and will sign up to be part of your film community.

4. You Need Connectors

Connectors are people who will help you increase your audience. Your audiences will fund your film and then come back and buy the download. You can find your audience online in groups and organizations.

Take the key words that describe your audience and search those on Facebook and Google. Then, contact the top 20 largest groups and organizations. You want to create “strategic partners.”  By contacting organizations and groups ho are interested in the subject matter of your film. Connecting to them is most important.

You must take your crowd to the crowdfunding. They don’t find you, you find then. My statistics show that on Indiegogo 99% of the donations come from the people who you have in your database or on your social network. In my opinion, Indiegogo does very little to bring you new donors.

Kickstarter campaigns do increase your data base.  We work with a crowdfunding expert on Kickstarter campaigns who really understands how Kickstarter works and does quite well raising funds for our filmmakers. As a result, he helped raised $120,000 for a film on sound, $64,000 on a film about a music composer, and over $100,000 for another film. I highly recommend him.  If you are interested, email me and I can introduce you to him.

5. Give Them a Sticky Story

A Sticky Story is one that has the elements of surprise, emotion, and it has something credible and something concrete.  Give your audience a sticky story, one they can remember and repeat.  One that will allow your donors to pitch to people for you and expand your data base.  

6. Stay in Touch with Donors

Set up a community with your crowdfunding audience after the crowdfunding. It’s very important for you to keep them engaged and attached like family to you and the film.  You’ve probably just raised money for a part of your film, maybe just pre-production or part of post-production, so you want to keep them close by to raise more money.

One woman I was mentoring said that she was writing her Kickstarter group to give them an update.   She said “I don’t know what to say because I am behind on my production schedule. I told them I would be much further along at this date.”

I said why not tell them the truth? Quote Orson Welles by saying “I spend 95% of my time raising money and 5% making the film.“ She did just that and someone called and ask her how much money she needed.  She told him, $120,000 and he sent her a check!

You never know how much money is available to you from this group of new people that you get through Kickstarter. Taking good care of them is paramount to future donations.

Carole Dean is president and founder of From the Heart Productions; a 501(c)3 non-The Art of Film Funding Podcastprofit that offers fiscal sponsorship for independent filmmakers. She hosts the weekly podcastThe Art of Film Fundinginterviewing those involved in all aspects of indie film productionShe is also the author of  The Art of Film Funding, 2nd Edition: Alternative Financing Concepts.  See IMDB for producing credits.

Roy W. Dean Grant Finalists for Summer 2017 Selected

Roy W. Dean Grant Finalists for Summer 2017 Selected

Winner to Receive $30,000 Grant to Complete Their Project

 

Roy W. Dean Grant Finalists for Summer 2017From The Heart Productions, the non-profit dedicated to helping indie filmmakers get funding, has selected 21 Roy W. Dean Grant finalists for Summer 2017.  Now in its 25th year, the grant seeks films that are unique and make a contribution to society.  The winner will receive $30,000 in a combination of cash and donated services from film industry professionals and companies which support independent filmmakers. 

“It’s so wonderful to see that great indie filmmaking is alive around the world” said Carole Dean, President of From the Heart Productions. “Submissions included entries from a record 22 countries.”

The grant is open to documentaries, features, short films and web series.  Every filmmaker that applies to the grant gets a free consultation on their project. 

That along with the cash and production services awarded has made the Roy W. Dean Grant one of the top grants to apply to for new filmmakers.  Just some of the nations represented in the applications include Sierra Leone, Ireland, Great Britain, Israel, Thailand, Japan, and India. 

About the Roy W. Dean Grant Finalists for Summer 2017

View overview of project summaries and filmmakers with loglines for the 21 Roy W. Dean Grant Finalists for Summer grant.  These films (some of which do not have web or social media sites set up as yet) include:

419: How Nigeria Was Scammed Out Of Its Rightful Identity (Documentary)

American Justice on Trial: People v. Newton (Documentary)

An Act of Terror (Short)

Axe Cop: The Documentary (working title) (Documentary)

Daughters of the Revolution (Documentary)

Finding Kai (Documentary)

Free Spirit (Feature)

In the Executioner’s Shadow (Documentary)

Ken and Alex (Documentary)

MANRY AT SEA ~ In the Wake of a Dream (Documentary)

No Man’s Land (Documentary)

Parallel Chords (Feature)

Pick (Short)

Restoring Balance: Autism Recovery (Documentary)

Salt Water (Feature)

Stone | Fruit (Feature)

The Rukus (Documentary)

Troubled Water (Documentary)

Untitled Witchcraft Project (Short)

Women of the Holocaust (Other)

Ashes To Eden: an Immigrant’s story (Documentary)

From this group of Roy W. Dean Grant Finalists for Summer 2017, a smaller group of 4 to 6 finalists will be selected by our judges. The winner will be chosen from that group and will be announced in late October.

This year’s grant winner will receive $3,500 in cash provided by From the Heart Productions and donations of film services and products from film industry professionals and companies.  Some of which include a 1TB G-Drive from G-Technology,  $1295.00 Scholarship to Writers Boot Camp , 35% discount on lighting from Paskal Lighting,  Discount of rental of screening room from Raliegh Studios, and much more from heartfelt donors those who care about helping independent filmmakers. 

About the Roy W. Dean Grant

Founded in 1992, there are 3 Roy W. Dean Grants awarded each year.   There is a Spring, Summer and Fall Grant.  The Fall Grant is now accepting entries and closes October 14th.  Films submitted to the grant can be short films, documentaries or features from early stages of pre-production to those needing help in post. 

The grant has been integral in helping talented artists with great stories get their films produced.  Recent past winners of the grant include the award winning “Heist: Who Stole the American Dream”, “The Brainwashing of My Dad”, and Emmy winner “Mia: A Dancer’s Journey” which just won an Emmy award.  

About From The Heart Productions

Carole Dean founded the 501(c)3 non-profit when she saw how many filmmakers with important, new, and often controversial stories were having trouble getting financing for their films.    From The Heart offers fiscal sponsorship for films which allows donors to get a tax deduction for their donations.  Their Intentional Filmmaking Classes which teaches filmmakers the tactics on how to get funded is now open for enrollment.  Classes start September 30th

Roy W. Dean Grant Spring 2017 Finalists Named

Roy W. Dean Grant Spring 2017 Finalists21 films that are unique and make a contribution to society were named as Roy W. Dean Grant Spring 2017 finalists.  The grant is offered by From The Heart Productions, the non-profit dedicated to helping filmmakers get funding.  The winner will receive $30,000 in a combination of cash and donated services from film industry professionals and companies which support independent filmmakers. 

“We are very fortunate to have so many filmmakers exploring stories and ideas that look to change how we view our world.” said Carole Dean, President of From the Heart Productions. “These finalists highlight the passion and dedication of the hundreds of applications we received.”

A record number of 345 films were submitted to this year’s Roy W. Dean Grant for Spring from across the US and around the world.  Entries were received from France, Mexico, Australia, Japan, Canada, and the United Kingdom.  The projects included features, short films, documentary, and web series. 

View overview of project summaries and filmmakers for the Roy W. Dean Grant Spring 2017 Finalists which include:

American Justice on Trial: People v. Newton (Documentary)      

Belly of the Beast (Documentary)

Bruce the Challenge (Feature)

Flight of the Dodo (Short)

Grace (Documentary)

Imagemakers (Documentary)

L (Feature)

Louder Than Thunder (Documentary)

Restoring Balance: Autism Recovery (Documentary)

Rising Up to Climate Change: Storytelling with Saris (Documentary)

Stoke (Feature)

Stranger At Home (Documentary)          

Stunt Life (Documentary)

The Creative High (Documentary)

The Last Amendment (Documentary)

The Real Thing (Short)

The Roar of a Lion Cub (Documentary)

What If (Short)

Yellow is Forbidden (Documentary)

Yoshi: Wake Up With Me (Documentary)

Now in its 25th year, the Roy W. Dean Grant seeks films that are unique and make a contribution to society that need help getting started or completed.   Out of this group of 21 Roy W. Dean Grant Spring 2017 finalists, a smaller group of 4 to 6 finalists will be selected by our judges.  From that group will come the winner of the Roy W. Dean Grant.  Winner is expected to be announced in late September.

This year’s grant winner will receive $3,500 in cash provided by From the Heart Productions and donations of film services and products from film industry professionals and companies.  Some of which include a 1TB G-Drive from G-Technology, a 30% discount in equipment rental from AbelCine Tech, Inc. NYC, 40% deduction on color, editing, and production services from ProMedia, and much more from heartfelt donors those who care about helping independent filmmakers. 

About the Roy W. Dean Grant

Founded in 1992, there are 3 Roy W. Dean Grant every year.   There is a Spring, Summer and Fall Grant.  The Fall Grant is now accepting entries and closes September 30th.  Films submitted to the grant can be short films, documentaries or features from early stages of pre-production to those needing help in post. 

The grant is integral in helping talented artists with great stories get their films produced.  Recent past winners of the grant include the award winning “Heist: Who Stole the American Dream”, “The Brainwashing of My Dad”, and Emmy winner “Mia: A Dancer’s Journey” which just won an Emmy award.  

About From The Heart Productions

The 501(c)3 non-profit was founded by Carole Dean when she saw how many filmmakers with important, new, and often controversial stories were having trouble getting financing for their films.    From The Heart offers fiscal sponsorship for films which allows donors to get a tax deduction for their donations.  Their Intentional Filmmaking Classes which teaches filmmakers the tactics on how to get funded is now open for enrollment.  Classes start September 30th

The Science of Getting Rich (Part 8) – Receiving Riches

In my series of videos on The Science of Getting Rich, Wallace D. Wattles’ pioneering work on using the power of your mind, I’ve covered his steps to creating your success.    Now, in Part 8, it comes together as we learn about receiving riches.

Thinking Stuff

Wallace says there is a thinking stuff from which all things are made. 

In its original state, it permeates, penetrates, and fills the interspaces of the universe.  A thought in this substance produces the thing that is imaged by the thought.  Wallace says we can form things in our thoughts. 

Then, by impressing our thought upon what he calls the formless substance, we can cause the thing we think about to be created. 

Passing From Competitive to Creative Mind

In order to create, we must pass from the competitive to the creative mind.  Otherwise,Science of Getting Rich (Part 8) Receiving Riches we cannot be in harmony with the formless intelligence which is always creative and never competitive in spirit.

We may come into full harmony with the formless substance by entertaining a lively and sincere gratitude for the blessings it bestows upon us.  Gratitude unifies the mind of man with the intelligence of substance, so that man’s thoughts are received by the formless.  We can remain upon the creative plane only by uniting ourselves with the formless intelligence through a deep and continuous feeling of gratitude.

We must form a clear and definite mental image of the things we wish to have, to do, or to become; and we must hold this mental image in our thought, while being deeply grateful to the supreme that all his desires are granted to him. 

Receiving Riches

The man who wishes to get rich must spend his leisure hours in contemplating his vision. Too much stress is laid on the importance of frequent contemplation of the mental image, coupled with the unwavering faith and devout gratitude.  This is the process by which the impression is given to the formless substance and the creative forces set in motion.

All that is included in this mental image will surely be brought to the person who follows the instructions given and whose faith does not waver.

In order to receive,you must be active.  You must keep in mind the purpose to get rich through the realization of your mental image.  Every day you must do all that can be done that day.  Take care to do each act in a successful manner.  You must give to every person a use value in excess of the cash value you receive so that each transaction makes for more life to all that you touch.

The men and women who practice these instructions will certainly get rich; and the riches they receive will be in exact proportion to the definiteness of their vision, the fixity of their purpose, the steadiness of their faith and the depth of their gratitude.  This concludes Wallace’s brilliant book.

I sincerely thank you for watching these videos.  I believed that Wallace’s wisdom when applied can benefit all of us.  Knowing that you have the power to create your future is a key to a successful and prosperous life.  Please take this information to heart and use it. 

Carole Dean is president and founder of From the Heart Productions; a 501(c)3 non-profit that offers fiscal sponsorship for independent filmmakers. She hosts the weekly podcastThe Art of Film Fundinginterviewing those involved in all aspects of indie film productionShe is also the author of The Art of Film Funding, 2nd Edition: Alternative Financing Concepts.  See IMDB for producing credits.

The Science of Getting Rich (Part 7) – Acting in The Certain Way

Wallace D. Wattle, author of the Science of Getting Rich, believed that by Acting in the Certain Way, our thoughts are the impelling force which causes the creative power to act.  Wallace was a pioneer in realizing and writing about the power of your mind. 

In part 7 of my video series on his groundbreaking work, I cover how by Acting in the Certain Way it will bring riches to you.  But, he says, you must not rely upon thought alone; paying no attention to personal action.  The failure to meet thought with personal action is the downfall of many people.

Acting in the Certain Way

What is a Certain Way?   Rebecca Fine of the Science of Getting Rich Network describes it as “basically knowing that you are creating your own experience with your thoughts and the actions that grow out of those thoughts.”

So, we must not only think, but we must act on our goals too.  By thought he believes, you can cause the gold in the hearts of the mountains to be impelled toward you.  But it will not mine itself, refine itself, or coin itself into double eagles and come rolling along the roads seeking its way into your pocket. 

Wallace says that your thought makes all things animate and inanimate work to bring you want you want; but your personal activity must be such that you can rightly receive what you want when it reaches you.

The scientific use of thought consists in forming a clear and distinct mental image of what you want; in holding fast to the purpose to get what you want; and in realizing with grateful faith that you do get what you want.

Impress Your Thinking on to the Formless Substance

That Formless Substance, explains Wallace, has the same desire for more life that youScience of Getting Rich (Part 4) Thinking in a Certain Way have; upon receiving your vision, sets all the creative forces at work in and through their regular channels of action but directed towards you.

Therefore, you must act in a Certain Way so that you can appropriate what is yours when it comes to you.  You can meet the things you have in your picture and put them in their proper places as they arrive.

This is the crucial point in the Science of Getting Rich where thought and personal action must be combined.  Now you must provide for the reception of the thing you want when it comes.

By thought, the thing you want is brought to you; by action you receive it.  Put your mind into present action. Think in the now and begin to make ready for the reception of what you want. And your action, whatever it is must be in your present business and must be upon the persons and things in your present environment.

Use Vision and Faith to Set Creative Force in Motion

Hold with faith and purpose the vision of yourself in the better environment.  But, act upon your present environment with all your heart and with all your strength and with all your mind and act now.

Your vision and faith will set the creative force in motion to bring it toward you and your action will cause the forces in your environment to move you toward the place you want.  Remember, Wallace says there is a thinking stuff from which all things are made and which in its original state, permeates, penetrates, and fills the interspaces of the universe.  A thought in this substance produces the thing that is imaged by the thought. 

In order to do this, you must move from the competitive to the creative mind.  You must have a clear mental picture of what you want.  Hold this picture in your thoughts with fixed purpose and unwavering faith. 

And you must act now and take efficient action which we will cover in the final part 8.

Carole Dean is president and founder of From the Heart Productions; a 501(c)3 non-profit that offers fiscal sponsorship for independent filmmakers. She hosts the weekly podcastThe Art of Film Fundinginterviewing those involved in all aspects of indie film productionShe is also the author of The Art of Film Funding, 2nd Edition: Alternative Financing Concepts.  See IMDB for producing credits.

The Science of Getting Rich (Part 6) – Further Use of the Will

by Carole Dean

 

Wallace D. Waddle’s incredible book, The Science of Getting Rich, details how you can manifest success.   Written in the early 20th century, Wallace was a pioneer in realizing and writing about the power of your mind. 

In Part 6 of my video series on The Science of Getting Rich, I analyze his belief on the further use of your will in attaining that success.  

Wallace says that you cannot retain a true and clear vision of wealth if you are constantly turning your attention to opposing pictures. 

Don’t Focus on Past Troubles

Do not tell of your past troubles of a financial nature, if you have had them, do not think of them at all.   Do not tell of the poverty of your parents or hardships of your early life.  This will check the movement of things in your direction.

Put poverty and all things that pertain to poverty completely behind you.  By following Wallace’s theory of the universe as being correct, you are resting all your hopes of happiness on its being correct.  Your faith will bring this to completion.

No matter how horrible things appear in other countries, do not spend your time thinking about them. Please, interest yourself in your future.  Wallace wants you to give your attention wholly to riches.  To become rich, he writes, is the noblest aim you can have in life, for it includes everything else. 

Attaining Physical Health

On the competitive plane, the struggle to get rich is a Godless scramble for power over Science of Getting Rich (Part 4) Thinking in a Certain Wayother men; but when we come into the creative mind, all this is changed.  All that is possible in the new way of greatness and soul unfoldment, of service and lofty endeavor comes by way of getting rich.

If you lack physical health, you will find that the attainment of it… is conditional on your getting rich.

Only those emancipated from financial worry, and who have the means to live a care-free existence and follow good health practices, can have and retain health.

Moral and Spiritual Greatness

Moral and spiritual greatness is possible only to those who are above the competitive battle for existence.  Only those who are becoming rich on the plane of creative thought are free from the degrading influences of competition.

You can aim at nothing so great or noble, I repeat as to become rich; and you must fix your attention upon your mental picture of riches, to the exclusion of all that may tend to dim or obscure the vision.

You must see your life moving forward toward fuller expression and more complete happiness.

Read The Science of Getting Rich each day and commit it to memory.  There is a thinking stuff from which all things are made.   In its original state it permeates, penetrates and fills the interspaces of the universe.  A thought in this substance producer the thing that is imaged by the thought. 

Form and hold your clear mental picture of what you want and hold this relentlessly in your vision.  Wallace says you must live and act in a Certain way and we cover this in part 7.

Carole Dean is president and founder of From the Heart Productions; a 501(c)3 non-profit that offers fiscal sponsorship for independent filmmakers. She hosts the weekly podcastThe Art of Film Fundinginterviewing those involved in all aspects of indie film productionShe is also the author of The Art of Film Funding, 2nd Edition: Alternative Financing Concepts.  See IMDB for producing credits.

The Science of Getting Rich (Part 4) – Thinking in a Certain Way

by Carole Dean

It’s not enough just to want something to manifest it.   You’ve got to try “thinking in a certain way” to attain it.  

Thinking in a certain way is how Wallace D. Wattles, author of The Science of Getting Rich, describes the need to have a clear image of your goal.  In my latest video based on his work, I explain how it can work for you.  

Wallace was a pioneer in realizing and writing about the power of your mind.  In his book, he explains and shows us how to use that power to better our lives, become successful, and to expand our creativity.

Thinking in A  Certain Way – Desire is Not Enough

Remember the man in the Gratitude video # 3 who formed the mental image of his house in order to manifest it and you will have a fair idea of this initial step towards getting rich.  In other words, its important to create a clear and definite mental picture of what you want; you cannot transmit an idea unless first you have it yourself.

You must have it before you can get it.  Many people fail to impress “thinking substance”Science of Getting Rich (Part 4) Thinking in a Certain Way because they themselves only have a vague concept of the things they want to do… to have.… or to become.

It is not enough that you should have a general desire for wealth, everybody has that.  When you try to impress your thoughts on Substance, remember that it must be done by a coherent statement; you must know what you want, and be definite.  You can never get rich, or start the creative power into action, by sending out unformed longings and vague desires.

Form a Clear Mental Picture

Go over your desires just as the man I have described went over his house; see just what you want and get a clear mental picture of it as you wish it to look when you get it.

You must have that clear mental picture continually in mind as the sailor has in mind the port toward which he is sailing the ship.  Spend as much of your leisure time as possible in contemplating your picture.  The clearer your picture and the more you dwell upon this picture the stronger your desire will be and the stronger your desire, the easier it will be to hold your mind fixed upon this picture of what you want.

Behind this clear vision must be the purpose to realize it.  See the things you want as if they were truly around you all the time.  See yourself using them.  Dwell on your mental picture so it is clear and then take the mental attitude of ownership with the faith that it is yours.  And remember gratitude and be thankful for what you are visualizing as if you already possessed it.

You do not make this impression by repeating a strings of word; you make it by holding the vision with unshakable PURPOSE to attain it with unrelenting faith.

Remember it is faith and purpose in the use of the imagination which make the difference between the scientist and the dreamer.  And having learned this fact, it is here that you must learn the proper use of the Will.  We will cover that in part 5.

Carole Dean is president and founder of From the Heart Productions; a 501(c)3 non-profit that offers fiscal sponsorship for independent filmmakers. She hosts the weekly podcastThe Art of Film Fundinginterviewing those involved in all aspects of indie film productionShe is also the author of The Art of Film Funding, 2nd Edition: Alternative Financing Concepts.  See IMDB for producing credits.