Fall 2016 Roy W. Dean Grant Won by “Do No Harm”

“Silent Epidemic” of Physician Suicide Exposed in Eye-Opening Documentary Feature

Oxnard, CA Jan 16th, 2016   Why are the doctors we rely on to keep us healthy, ending their own lives at an alarming rate?  Emmy winning former PBS Producer/Director Robyn Symon examines this critical problem in the documentary Do No Harm, the winner of the Fall 2016 Roy W. Dean Grant.   As the grant winner, Robyn will receive $30K in cash, film products, and services to help her finish her project. 

Still from Roy W. Dean Grant Winner “Do No Harm”

The Roy W. Dean Grant is awarded 3 times each year to a unique film that makes a contribution to society.   Founded in 1993 by the 501(c)3 non-profit From the Heart Productions, grants are open to all types of film projects including documentaries, short films, features, and web series in any stage of production

Following three people bonded by grief, “Do No Harm” delves into why young physicians in medical school have the highest suicide rate of any profession, almost twice the national average.  They are jumping from hospital roofs, hanging themselves in closets and overdosing on readily available drugs. “This documentary reveals a dark side of our medical system.” commented Carole Dean, president of From the Heart Productions. “We are proud to support Robyn and her work to shine a light through her film on this important underreported story.”

The film shows how what it calls this ‘dirty little secret” in the medical community is a symptom of a broken heath care system that’s not only putting the lives of doctors at risk…  but patients too.

“Medical mistakes are the third leading cause of death in the United States alone,”notes director Robyn Symone,”often caused by sleep-deprived and disillusioned doctors forced to practice assembly line medicine. And the crisis is getting worse.”

About the Filmmaker

Robyn Symon is a two-time Emmy winning Producer/Director and has produced programming for many national networks including PBS, The Travel Channel, CNBC and DISCOVERY HEALTH. Robyn began her career as a TV news reporter in Texas before joining the PBS station WPBT in Miami, where she produced documentaries, public affairs programs, the TV series Florida!, the docu-series Voices of Vision, and the medical series Health & Family airing on the Discovery Health network.

Her most recent film, Uncle Gloria: One Helluva Ride!, was selected for a prestigious Film Independent Documentary Lab Fellowship and will premiere at a Miami film festival in April 2016. In addition to two Emmys, Robyn has been honored with 3 national Telly awards; 2 national NABJ awards and honors by both the Associated Press and UPI.

The Fall 2016 Roy W. Dean Grant includes $3,000 cash given by From The Heart Productions.  The winners also receive a hard drive from G-Technology, $15,000 in theme and score music from composer David Raiklen,  $6,000 in animation services from Charlie Canfield,  one week DSLR camera package rental from Birns & Sawyer,  and much more from many heart-felt donors

About the Roy W. Dean Grant

Now in its 23rd year, the Roy W. Dean Grant has awarded over $2,000,000 in cash and donated film services to films.  The grant has been an important lifeline for filmmakers needing help to continue working on their film and to get it completed.  Without assistance from the grant, many excellent and important films may never have been made. 

Past winners of the grant that have been completed include the Emmy winning Mia: A Dancer’s Journey, the SXSW Best of Fest Music Film The Winding Stream: An Oral History of the Carter and Cash Family, and the now in release on video and on demand the very relevant The Brainwashing of My Dad.

About From The Heart Productions

From The Heart Productions is a 501(c)3 non-profit dedicated to helping filmmakers get their projects funded and made.  Besides providing funding through the grant, they are also a fiscal sponsor which allows donations made to films they sponsor to be tax deductible.  From The Heart has raised over $2.4 million for crowdfunding films as a partner with Indiegogo.  President Carole Dean is the best-selling author of The Art of Film Funding: 2nd Edition, Alternative Financing Concepts

For More Information, please contact

Richard Kaufman

www.fromtheheartproductions.com

“The Coverup” Wins Roy W. Dean Spring Film Grant for 2016

Roy W. Dean Spring Film Grant Winning Documentary Uncovers Effects of Toxic Chemicals in Cosmetics and Personal Care Products

Oxnard, CA  Oct 4, 2016  From The Heart Productions, the 501(c)3 non-profit with a mission to help filmmakers get their films funded, has awarded the Roy W. Dean Spring Film Grant of 2016 to the feature documentary, The Coverup, and its mother and daughter filmmaking team of Lynn Pelletier and Malina Fagan.  For winning the grant, they will receive $30k in cash, film products and services to complete their film.

Started in 1993, the Roy W. Dean Film Grant is awarded 3 times each year to films that are unique and make a contribution to society.  There is a Spring, Winter, and Fall Grant.  The grants are open to all types of film projects including documentaries, short films, features, and web series in any stage of production.  225 films were submitted for this year’s Roy W. Dean Spring Film Grant from the United States and around the world.

"The Coverup" - 2016 Roy W. Dean Spring Film Grant Winner

“The Coverup” – 2016 Roy W. Dean Spring Film Grant Winner

“The Coverup” reveals that the average person is exposed to about 126 chemicals a day, just from their cosmetics and personal care products (soap, shampoo, deodorant, toothpaste, makeup, etc.).  Scientists have linked some of the chemicals to serious health effects including cancer, infertility, and birth defects. The documentary seeks to empower consumers and companies alike and challenge our government to protect the public.

Filmmakers Lynn and Malina had previously applied several times to the Roy W. Dean Film Grant.  Like all other applicants, were given a free consultation to improve their application. They persisted and made the appropriate adjustments and eventually won the grant. 

“These two women are talented and determined.” admired Carole Dean, president and founder of From the Heart Productions. “Those are two traits that always equal success in film funding.  It’s especially nice for myself and Carole Joyce, my daughter who helps with grant outreach, to be able to give the grant to another mother and daughter team.”

“The Coverup” reveals that the average person is exposed to about 126 chemicals a day, just from their cosmetics and personal care products (soap, shampoo, deodorant, toothpaste, makeup, etc.).  Scientists have linked some of the chemicals to serious health effects including cancer, infertility, and birth defects.  The documentary seeks to empower consumers and companies to challenge the government to protect the public.

Filmmaker's Lynn and Malina Fagan

Malina Fagan and Lynn Pelletier

Lynn Pelletier and Malina Fagan are the dynamic mother-daughter duo behind “The Coverup”.  Lynn is a health practitioner of over 30 years who specializes in acupuncture and allergy treatments.  Malina is an award winning filmmaker who is passionate about health, the environment and human empowerment. Having lost several people in their family to cancer, they are committed to raising awareness of environmental toxins and disease prevention.

Malina’s films have premiered in IMAX at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science, aired on Rocky Mountain PBS, and been selected at festivals across the country, winning awards for their cinematography and storytelling. 

For winning the Roy W. Dean Spring Film Grant, they will receive $3,500 cash donated by From The Heart Productions.  The grant also includes a hard drive from G-Technology, tape stock from Media Distributors, discount on color, editing and production services from Promedia, equipment rental from Alpha Cine NY,  and much more from many heart-felt donors

About the Roy W. Dean Grant

Now in its 23rd year, the Roy W. Dean Grant has awarded over $2,000,000 in cash and donated film services to films.   The grant has been an important lifeline for filmmakers needing help to continue working on their film and to get it completed.  Without assistance from the grant, many excellent and important films may never have been made. 

Past winners of the grant that have been completed include the Emmy winning Mia: A Dancer’s Journey, the SXSW Best of Fest Music Film The Winding Stream: An Oral History of the Carter and Cash Family, and the now in release on video and on demand The Brainwashing of My Dad

About From The Heart Productions

From The Heart Productions is a 501(c)3 non-profit dedicated to helping filmmakers get their projects funded and made.  Besides providing funding through the grant, they are also a fiscal sponsor which allows donations made to films they sponsor to be tax deductible.  From The Heart has raised over $2.3 million for crowdfunding films as a partner with Indiegogo.  President Carole Dean is the best-selling author of The Art of Film Funding: 2nd Edition, Alternative Financing Concepts

For More Information, please contact

Richard Kaufman

www.fromtheheartproductions.com

Finalists Chosen for Roy W. Dean Spring Film Grant

6 Films in Running for 1st Roy W. Dean Film Grant of 2016

From The Heart Productions, the non-profit dedicated to helping filmmakers get funding, announced the 6 finalists for the Roy W. Dean Spring Film Grant.  Winner will receive $30,000 in a combination of cash and donated services from film industry professionals and companies.

Grant finalist "U Htein Lin – Mr. Bright and Shiny"

Grant finalist “U Htein Lin – Mr. Bright and Shiny”

The 6 finalists were selected out of an initial group of 22 finalists for grant.  Over 225 submissions were received for this year’s grant.  The projects included features, short films, documentary, and web series.

“Filmmakers with unique stories that contribute to society have the toughest road to get funding” said From the Heart President Carole Dean “That is why we founded the grant.  Without it’s help, these projects might otherwise never get made.”

The grant includes $3,500 in cash and donations of film services and products.  Some of which include a 1TB G-Drive ev ATC from G-Technology, a 30% discount in equipment rental from AbelCine Tech, Inc. NYC, 40% deduction on color, editing, and production services from ProMedia, and much more from those who care about helping independent filmmakers.

The films and their filmmakers chosen as Roy W. Dean Grant Finalists are:

Belly of the Beast – Erika Cohn – Documentary intimately chronicles the journey of women fighting reproductive injustice in their communities.

Holden On – Tamlin Hall – Based on a true story of dual diagnosis, the feature is a dynamic 17-year-old’s point of view journey to keep his mental illness a secret at all costs.

How the Cats Took Over the Internet – Laurin Lazin – Documentary feature film for all ages. It takes a provocative and entertaining look at the history, meaning, and impact of user-generated content… as seen through the lens of the cat video.

Stranger at Home – Luis Remesar – Documentary film about a Navy psychologist’s mission to hold military medicine accountable for solutions to the mental health epidemic decimating our warrior class.

The Coverup – Malina Fagan – The documentary reveals startling information previously hidden from consumers that links exposure to low dose chemicals used in soaps, lotions, baby shampoos, deodorants, etc. to devastating health effects such as cancer, infertility, birth defects and more. This solution oriented film teaches viewers how to protect themselves, their families and the environment, and challenges our government to protect the public.

U Htein Lin – Mr. Bright and Shiny – Vanessa Smith – Documentary on a Burmese artist who was sentenced to prison without a fair trial and who spent 6 and one half years in prison.

About the Roy W. Dean Grant

Now in its 24th year, the Roy W. Dean Grant is awarded 3 times each year.   There is a Spring, Summer and Fall Grant.  The Fall Grant is now accepting entries and closes September 30th.  Films submitted to the grant can be short films, documentaries or features from early stages of pre-production to those needing help in post.

The grant has been integral in helping talented artists with great stories get their films produced.  Recent past winners of the grant include the award winning “Heist: Who Stole the American Dream” and “The Winding Stream: An Oral History of the Carter and Cash Family”, and Mia: A Dancer’s Journey which just won an Emmy award.

About From The Heart Productions

The 501(c)3 non-profit was founded by Carole Dean when she saw how many filmmakers with important, new, and often controversial stories were having trouble getting financing for their films.    From The Heart is a fiscal sponsor for films which allows donors to get a tax deduction for their donations.  Their Intentional Filmmaking Class that teaches filmmakers the tactics on how to get funded is now open for enrollment.  Classes start September 26th.

Keeping Faith

By diane estelle Vicari

I was inspired to make my documentary Imagining a Better World in 2006 when I first read Dr. Nelly Toll’s award winning biography Behind the Secret Window: her remarkable story of hiding from the Nazis in occupied Poland alongside her mother during WWII.

Painting by Nelly Toll

Painting by Dr. Nelly Toll

Still a child during this terrible ordeal, with her mother’s love as her only protection, Nelly created a body of sixty watercolor paintings depicting what her life would resemble under normal circumstances.

Without the kindness of a Catholic family, who risked their lives simply by hiding them, Nelly and her mom would not have survived.

Today, a renowned art therapist and teacher, she believes strongly in emphasizing the positive values she took away from her experience to triumph over adversity as she goes and visits schools, of all levels, across the country to share her story.

The Nelly Toll Story is another example of “one man can make a difference”, a theme explored in my previous work, Sugihara: Conspiracy of Kindness.  This documentary film relates the story of Japanese Diplomat Chiune Sempo Sugihara who risked it “all” acting against government orders during WWII to save the lives of strangers, by writing visas for escaping Jews.

He did so with the belief that somehow these strangers would find their way to safety.  Were it not for his courageous actions, some 60,000 people would not be alive today.

As a storyteller, I am constantly reminded that FAITH is a critical tool in my work as well.   Without it, no matter the value of our vision, it will not bear fruit.  If courageous individuals, like Dr. Nelly Toll and Chiune Sugihara could “imagine a better world” under some of the worst circumstances in our history, well, so can we.

As a filmmaker and a messenger, my subjects teach me through their stories, to have faith in a better humanity.

diane estelle Vicari, Director / Producer is an award-­winning filmmaker and is internationally renowned for her work in promoting the production and advancement of the documentary film genre.  Now in production on Imagining a Better World, her last documentary, Sugihara: Conspiracy of Kindness, won the Hollywood Film Festival Award for Best Documentary and the prestigious IDA/ Pare Lorentz Award. It has also been honored by the United Nations and aired nationally on PBS.

Dissecting Docs: This Ain’t No Mouse Music

by Carole Dean

When 16 year old Chris Strachwitz left Germany and came to the US in 1960, he played his radio every day because he was so impressed with the music in America.  He loved it all!

This Aint No Mouse Music 2He listened to Mexican music, soul, and blues, jazz and accordion music.  Chris developed a very good “ear” for music.  He knew how to discern talented people.  But, many of the artists he liked were older musicians whose work would be lost when they went away.

He decided to dedicate his life to record them to save their music.

In the documentary “This Ain’t No Mouse Music”, we follow Chris from teenage music lover to a restless archivist who discovered and preserved the work of many great songs and artists.

He started on a shoestring.  He began to record music exactly where he found it.  In front yards, restaurants, bars, by the lake.  Wherever the musicians played, that’s where Chris recorded them.

Chris never had a studio.  He never wanted one.  He wanted to record the music just where he found it.  This brilliant idea really worked, you can hear it in the recordings.  It’s natural and the outside or surrounding sounds belong.

Music was the life blood in the heart of these deep rooted communities. People loved their music and loved their musicians.

Chris started his own record label Arhoolie Records.   Arhoolie is the word for a field hand in the south.   He became a folk, blues and soul music detective combing Texas, Louisiana & Mississippi for musicians and also for local records.

During his search for music, he found folklorist Mac McCormick who became a brilliant partner to help Chris in his quest.  Chris & Mac were not afraid to ask anyone for the names of musicians.  Once they had a name, they used their detective skills and went to work to find them.

This desire to find folk music in the South would cause him to find some of the greats.   He found Fred McDowell, Aakka White, and Big Mama Thornton, who sang Hound Dog and I Smell a Rat.

He found Richard Thompson, John Jackson, Mance Lipscomb, Charlie Musclewhite and Big Joe Williams whose great song is Sloppy Drunk!

Chris took many of these people to the folk festivals and on tour to either create or resurrect their careers.   He took Big Mama Thornton overseas where she recorded on of her best-selling record Big Momma Thornton – In Europe.

He recorded Country Joe and the Fish singing their anti-Vietnam War song I Feel Like I’m Fixing to Die Rag.  Chris recorded this in his home and when they were leaving they said, “What do we owe you for the recording?”

“Well, you don’t have a publisher,” Chris replied “So, let me be the publisher.”

They signed a contract which brought Chris a lot of money.  Chris used this income to cross the country and find us these marvelous musicians.   Years later, when they next met, Chris gave the publishing rights back to the artist.

Chris is a one-man-band by finding the talent, producing, recording, editing, marketing, selling and promoting.  He even shows you how to wash your records!

If you love music, musicians and good bio pics, this is a wonderful film for you.

Songs truly are the poetry of the people…

The podcast Dissecting Docs with Carole Dean and Don Schwartz is dedicated to our most precious and beloved filmmakers, the documentary filmmaker.  Each week, the show honors these brilliant creatives who give of their time, energy, and sometimes their freedom to bring us the truth.  They are our last vestige of sincere, unbiased reporters who put their heart into their films.

 

 

“Sands of Silence” Wins 2nd Roy W. Dean Film Grant of 2015

Documentary Exposes International Underworld of Sex Trafficking

Oxnard, CA Oct 30th, 2015 – The Summer Roy W. Dean Grant has been awarded to director Chelo Alvarez-Stehle for her feature length documentary “Sands of Silence”. Overseen by the non-profit From the Heart Productions, the film grant is the second of three awarded each year to a filmmaker with a unique project that contributes to society.

Sands of Silence 2“Chelo’s dedication to the production of her film, ‘Sands of Silence’ is exemplary” said Carole Dean, president of From the Heart Productions.  “This film will change lives, open conversations and raise the consciousness on many hidden issues.  We are honored to support Chelo in getting this film made”.

The Roy W. Dean Grant is open to all types of film projects including documentaries, short films, features, and web series in any stage of production.  Submissions were received from from across U.S. as well as internationally from United Kingdom, Australia, and Nigeria.  Winner receives cash and donated film services to help complete their film.

In “Sands of Silence”, Chelo records a 15-year quest to expose the underworld of sex trafficking from Asia to the Americas back to the windswept beach where her childhood ended and family secrets began. Documenting the transformation of young women in Mexico and Nepal from powerless victims” to resilient survivors and passionate advocates, the filmmaker undertakes a parallel journey toward personal healing and family reconciliation.

“I still remember the thought-provoking Documentary Trailblazer course I took with Carole Dean over 10 years ago.” said director Alvarez-Stehle upon learning she had won the grant.  “The course spanned over 12 weeks and it was a stepping stone in my path towards documentary filmmaking.”

From the Heart Productions has also served as a fiscal sponsor for the grant winning documentary.

“Carole was there for me through good and bad times and has always been a beacon and an inspiration. So now that my film is finally about to see the light after all these years, receiving the Roy W Dean Grant feels like coming around full circle, a feeling of completion, as if the positive energy that she encouraged me to pour in my film, had manifested. I could not be more grateful”.

Director Chelo Alvarez-Stehle

Director Chelo Alvarez-Stehle

Journalist, documentary and new media producer Chelo Alvarez-Stehle has worked for over 15 years exposing stories of human trafficking through her creative and outreach work. She worked on documentaries for NHK and became Spain’s El Mundo daily correspondent first in Tokyo, then in Los Angeles. Canal+ Spain turned one of her print reportages on trafficking in the Himalayas into TIN GIRLS feature documentary film.

As producer/director she did her first short documentaries WISDOM IN SMOKE and THE POWER OF 2 distributed to 30 countries, in Cuba.  She then directed and co-produced the SOLD IN AMERICA: A Modern-Day Tale of Sex-Slavery (Montreal Human Rights Film Festival.)  She is currently producing/directing a transmedia project that encompasses the feature-length documentary SANDS OF SILENCE: Journey into Trafficking, the SOS_SLAVES social impact videogame and a micro-documentary series on sexual exploitation. She has just produced the short documentary THROUGH THE WALL, about a family divided by the US/Mexico border.

In addition to $3,500 cash given by From The Heart Productions, the winner receives goods, services, and discounts including hard drives from G-Technology, tape stock from Media Distributors, post production consultation from colorist Sam Dlugach, music post production from Audiokut,  a full scholarship to The Writer’s Boot Camp, and much more from many heart-felt donors.

About the Roy W. Dean Grant

Now in its 23rd year, the Roy W. Dean Grant has awarded over $2,000,000 in cash and donated film services to films that without its help may never have been made.  Films submitted to the grant can be short films, documentaries or features from early stages of pre-production to those needing help in post.

The grant has been integral in fostering award winning films.  Past winners of the grant that have been completed include the award winning “Heist: Who Stole the American Dream”, emmy winning “Mia: A Dancer’s Journey” and “The Winding Stream: An Oral History of the Carter and Cash Family” which is now showing in film festivals around North America.

About From The Heart Productions

From The Heart Productions is a 501(c)3 non-profit dedicated to helping filmmakers get their projects made.  Besides providing funding through the grant, they are also a fiscal sponsor which allows donations made to films they sponsor to be tax deductible.  From The Heart has raised over $1.9 million for crowdfunding films as a partner with Indiegogo.  President Carole Dean is the best-selling author of “The Art of Film Funding” which is now in its second edition.

Making Fair Use as Easy as 1-2-3

3 Questions To Ask When Using Material From Other Sources in Your Film

by Carole Dean

Entertainment attorneys Michael Donaldson and Lisa Callif are the leading authorities on fair use.  Michael, in fact, is often referred to as the “fair use Guru”.  His “Clearance and Copyright” is used in over 50 film schools and has become the standard reference book for the industry.

Entertainment Attorney Michael Donaldson has been called the

“The Fair Use Guru” – Entertainment Attorney Michael Donaldson

I interviewed them recently on my podcast The Art of Film Funding and Michael provided me with insights and questions that a filmmaker should ask about fair use as it relates to their film.  Once you have the answers, you can use fair use comfortably in your film.

Michael says you need to ask these three questions:

  1. Are you using somebody else’s material to illustrate a point you are already making in your documentary, pretty simple- yes or no.
  2. Did you only use what’s reasonably appropriate? That’s got a lot of elasticity in it and that’s good.
  3. Is the connection between the point you are making and the material that you are using illustrated clearly to the average viewer?

“If you get a yes to all three questions,” Donaldson says, “you land up in what we call a Safe Harbor. It’s unassailable.  There is no way anybody is going to successfully argue that it’s not fair use.

“There is still a lot of fair uses: You know if the connection isn’t all that clear but when you explain it, it’s there, if you have a little bit of wobble room in the length that still might be a fair use, but it is not that solid safe harbor where nobody can get you.”

You may remember there was a lot of publicity lately about the film, “Los Angeles Plays Itself” saying that no one thought it could be released on DVD.  The documentary was made up of clips from other movies showing how Los Angeles was portrayed in each one.

Michael Donaldson got involved and cleared it. I asked him about this film how he was able to clear it.

“It’s funny because this was far from the most difficult film that we have had by a long shot.  It was a good example of the three questions.

“Thom Anderson (the writer/director), from start to finish talked about how Los Angeles plays itself in movies and he would mention specific films.  And as he mentioned the films, clips of those films played over his voice.

“You never see his face the entire film.  What you see is clips from all these movies and they just keep rolling for 90 minutes. Clips from other films, but each one separately, individually, is an illustration of what Tom Anderson is talking about so it’s a classic case for safe harbor fair use for each and every clip in that film.”

I asked Donaldson if this was a good film for us to watch to visually see what is Safe Harbor for fair use.

“It’s a very good film to watch for very safe fair use. Another one is “Room 237”, where 1/3 of the film is clips from the “Shining”, but each clips illustrates exactly what the interview subject is talking about. Very safe.”

Michael Donaldson’s “Clearance & Copyright” is available as an ebook with film clips to support his simple as 1-2-3 questions.  It also comes with many downloads of contracts and agreements you need for your film. http://www.donaldsoncallif.com/books

Carole Dean is the president and founder of From the Heart Productions and author of The Art of Film Funding, 2nd edition: Alternative Financing Concepts.  Her unique, innovative Intentional Filmmaking Class teaches filmmakers how to get their films funded.  New classes begin in September.  Discount for early enrollment. 

 

 

 

How to Mine Your Audience for Gold

by Carole Dean

 

“Who is your audience?”

It’s a common question that we ask of independent filmmakers submitting their documentary, feature, or short film to the Roy W. Dean Film Grant.  We find that 80% of our applications do not answer this important question.

Who is Your Audience

Do you know your audience?

Some say my audience is “everyone” which I encourage you not to do.  Judges will drop your proposal like a hot potato!

Some say “men and women from 18 to 48.”  That’s too broad.  We want to know everything possible about this audience.  If you had a description for your typical audience member like a “soccer mom in Indiana”, we would love it.

Why should you get so up-close-and-personal with your audience?  Your money for your film is now in their hands.  You will need to get dollars from them for research, for production, and again for post.  Plus, they will pay to download your film and probably help you put people in seats for theatrical on demand.

Ok, Carole, then how do I find my audience for my upcoming project?  Start by knowing more about your present audience.  These are fans of your other projects (hopefully you’ve got their names and emails or kept in touch with them on social media)

On a recent episode of my podcast The Art of Film Funding, Erica Anderson of Seed & Spark suggested to “get the names of 10 or more of your current fans and ask them questions.”  Mine your audience.

You want people in your database from different walks of life, who are not filmmakers, and who love the subject of your upcoming film.

Here are some questions to ask:

  • What social media platforms do you hang-out on?
  • Where do you engage with people online?
  • What kind of news do you pay attention to?
  • What kind of music do you listen to?
  • What blogs you follow?
  • What organizations do you belong to?
  • How do you spend your free time?
  • When you watch movies, how do you watch them?
  • Do you go to the theatre?
  • Do you primarily stream movies to your TV from some device?
  • Do you watch movies only on your laptop or your mobile phone?

With the answers to these questions, you begin to understand where you will reach others for your new audience.

Now you know where they hang-out online, how to speak to them based on what news they read and what blogs they pay attention to. You get a sense of how they pay attention to things.

Erica said “a headline from New York Times for instance is very different than a headline from BuzzFeed.” Now you have a better way to communicate with your potential audience.

Knowing what organizations they belong to gives you an idea of what organizations you can join.  You can begin to chat about your film because the content of this organization should be concerned about the same issues.

This same info can give you names of nonprofits to contact for strategic alliances if you are making a documentary and possibly for a feature.

Erica also says that “The last piece really is where does your audience see their movies? If it’s primarily on their laptop, that could change the way you are going to shoot the film, that could change the camera you choose, and how big your production value needs to be.  So, it can ultimately change the budget of your film.”

This mining effort can pay off with valuable information, donations, or investments.  Now you know what to put under audience on your grants and now you know what to do for marketing your film, tweeting it and how to write your posts on social media.

You are talking to your audience, so give them a name. I want you to know them like a character in a film.

 

Carole Dean is the president and founder of From the Heart Productions and author of The Art of Film Funding, 2nd edition: Alternative Financing Concepts.  Her Intentional Filmmaking Class teaches filmmakers how to get their films funded.  New classes begin in September.  Discount for early enrollment.  

 

Stephanie Howard Wins Roy W. Dean Film Grant

Documentary explores family members and loved ones who care for our wounded upon their return to civilian life

Oxnard, CA Feb 12, 2015 From The Heart Productions, the film funding non-profit that oversees the Roy W. Dean Film Grant, has awarded the final Film Grant of 2014 to director Stephanie Howard for her documentary “Not The Same: Families After War”.  Stephanie will receive nearly $30,000 in film services and cash to help fund her project and get it completed.

Soldier and Child

“Not The Same: Families After War” addresses the emotional challenges faced by those who care for their loved ones wounded in the wars of Iraq and Afghanistan. It is about military men and women who must now rely on their families to heal and to function.

The goal of this documentary is to create awareness of what it is like to care for our wounded, illuminate their “new normal” and celebrate the unsung heroes of war

“Stephanie is a passionate and very talented filmmaker who cares deeply about the subject of her documentary” commented Carole Dean, president of From The Heart Productions.  “It is wonderful to honor her work and assist her in getting this important project to the screen”

The Roy W. Dean Grant is awarded to films that are unique and make a contribution to society.  The grant offers cash as well as discounted production services and goods to help filmmakers get their projects started or completed.  Over 200 filmmakers applied for the Roy W. Dean Fall Film Grant.  The yearly deadline for submissions was September 30th, 2014.  Projects submitted included documentaries, narrative features, and short films.

In addition to $2,500 cash given by From The Heart Productions, the winner will receive a hard drive from G-Technology, tape stock from Comtel/Edgewise Media, major discounts on post production services from Solvent Dreams, full theme music and score from composer David Raiklen,  and much more from many heart-felt donors.

“Carole Dean and From the Heart Productions have been my fiscal sponsor for my documentary.  In that time, Carole has gone above and beyond to guide me through the documentary process and has always been there for advice… and some great “cheerleading.” said winner Stephanie Howard.

Submissions are now being accepted for the 2015 Roy W. Dean Spring Film Grant.   Cash value for the grant has been increased to $3,500.

About the Filmmaker

Stephanie is a co-producer of the award-winning documentary “Refusenik”.  She is a television news producer and writer based in Los Angeles and has worked at local television stations as well as the L.A. bureaus of Fox News Channel, CNN, NBC News and Reuters.  Stephanie is winner of a commemorative Los Angeles Area Emmy for her work as associate producer of the news magazine program “L.A. Roundtable”.  She has also been nominated for Emmy awards as a segment producer at KTTV News and KNBC-TV.

About the Roy W. Dean Grant

Now in its 23rd year, the Roy W. Dean Grant awards filmmakers with great stories, told with passion, the funding to get their projects started or completed.  Films submitted to the grant can be short films, documentaries or features from early stages of pre-production to those needing help in post.

The grant has been integral in making sure that talented artists with great stories get their films produced.  Recent past winners of the grant include the award winning “Heist: Who Stole the American Dream”, “The Winding Stream: An Oral History of the Carter and Cash Family” which was featured at film festivals in , and “Mia: A Dancer’s Journey” which just premiered in New York this February.

About From The Heart Productions

From The Heart Productions is a 501(c)3 non-profit dedicated to helping filmmakers get their projects made.  Besides providing funding through the grant, they are also a fiscal sponsor which allows donations made to films they sponsor to be tax deductible.  From The Heart has raised over $1.6 million for crowdfunding films as a partner with Indiegogo.  President Carole Dean is the best-selling author of “The Art of Film Funding” which is now in its second edition.

Rachel Seed Wins Roy W. Dean Film Grant

Winning documentary explores director’s search for the mother she never knew through their shared love of photography.

From The Heart Productions, the film funding non-profit that oversees the Roy W. Dean Film Grant, has awarded the 2014 Summer Film Grant to director Rachel Seed for her documentary “A Photographic Memory”.   Rachel will receive nearly $30,000 in film services and cash to help her complete her project.

Contact Sheet by Sheila Turner-Seed

Contact Sheet by Sheila Turner-Seed

Thirty years after the death of her mother, Sheila Turner-Seed, photographer Rachel Elizabeth Seed discovers her work—interviews with some of the greatest photographers of the 20th Century, including Henri Cartier-Bresson, Lisette Model and W. Eugene Smith—in her father’s garage.  When she threads the audio reels and presses play, she hears her mother’s voice for the first time since she was a baby. Rachel finds it familiar and comforting, and is transformed by the experience.

Wanting to know more about her mother and to revitalize and honor her work, Rachel revisits the photographers, as well as her mother’s friends and family, to learn who she was while also looking at how photography can help preserve memory and reconnect us with those we have lost.

Rachel Seed and Mother

Rachel Seed and Mother

Through this process, Rachel reconnects to her mother by discovering how much they have in common: their looks, ambition, career paths, and desire to settle down and have a family.  However, in order to move on with her own life, Rachel comes to realize she must set herself apart from Sheila, and to do that must find out if she has the same genetic predisposition to early death that took her mother’s life. Rachel’s ability to forge her own path hinges on these medical results.our country.

“In A Photographic Memory, I go on a journey to learn – through our shared profession – about the mother I never knew but whom I so desperately need to know.” Rachel explained on her Kickstarter campaign page for her film.

“I am blending my mother’s 1970s interviews with my own footage, creating a posthumous mother-daughter collaboration that connects me to my mother while re-examining the course of the careers of some of the most influential photographers in the history of the medium.”

In addition to $2,500 cash given by From The Heart Productions, the winner receives goods, services, and discounts including hard drives from G-Technology, tape stock from Comtel/Edgewise Media, marketing consultation and services from Smart Girls Productions,  audio post production from AudioKut, a full scholarship to The Writer’s Boot Camp,  lighting from Paskal Lighting, and much more from many heart-felt donors.

About the Filmmaker

Rachel Seed

Rachel Seed

Growing up surrounded by photography, Rachel Seed became a photographer nearly 20 years ago and has run a successful freelance business for the past few years, while also earning an MFA from Indiana University (in progress since 2009).  Since 2006, she has conducted 35 video interviews internationally of women and men whose mothers died when they were young, also photographing them.

This work has been supported by several grants including the Artist Enrichment Grant from the Kentucky Foundation for Women, The Yarka Vendrinska Memorial Award at the Maine Media Workshops, and a World Affairs Council Association grant for international travel, and exhibited in Russia and the United States. She was also named a Top 25 Artist at 3rd Ward Brooklyn’s annual contest in 2010.

About the Roy W. Dean Grant

Now in its 23rd year, the Roy W. Dean Grant funds unique films that make a contribution to society.  It gives filmmakers with great stories, told with passion, the funding to get their projects started or completed.  Films submitted to the grant can be short films, documentaries or features from early stages of pre-production to those needing help in post.

The grant has been integral in making sure that talented artists with great stories get their films produced.  Recent past winners of the grant that have been completed include the award winning “Heist: Who Stole the American Dream” and “The Winding Stream: An Oral History of the Carter and Cash Family” which is now showing in film festivals around North America.

About From The Heart Productions

From The Heart Productions is a 501(c)3 non-profit dedicated to helping filmmakers get their projects made.  Besides providing funding through the grant, they are also a fiscal sponsor which allows donations made to films they sponsor to be tax deductible.  From The Heart has raised over $1.5 million for crowdfunding films as a partner with Indiegogo.  President Carole Dean is the best-selling author of “The Art of Film Funding” which is now in its second edition.

 

The 2015 Roy W. Dean Spring Grant is now accepting submissions.  Cash value has increased this year to $3,500.  If you’d like to submit your project, please go to the Roy W. Dean Grant Application Page and follow instructions.  The deadline for submissions is April 30th 2015.